Books

10 Busy Brooms

21st Sep 2016

“A jaunty counting story as a witch with “a long, speedy broom” invites nine of her compatriots to join her for a ride. Though the rhymes often suggest the witches are in a degree of peril (“3 little witches zipping through the night/ saw a ghost haunt a witch as she jumped in fright”), Fleming opts for cuteness over creepiness . . . It’s an enjoyable celebration of witchy sisterhood.” August, 2016 Publishers Weekly

“This is such a cute counting book that’s Halloween/witch themed, but don’t worry — it’s super happy and bright and fun. My nephew loves it and keeps asking for me to read it again (and again and again). Beautiful illustrations — I love how each character is unique and diverse.” Goodreads Sep 14, 2016 Kendra rated it 5 stars.

Click here to view on Amazon.com

The Twelve Days of Christmas in Ohio

4th Aug 2015

“Absolutely delightful and a perfect gift! Two stories emerge — one on the right side of the page with the details of the song, emphasizing Ohio. ‘On the first of Christmas my cousin gave to me . . . a cardinal in a buckeye tree.’ On the left side of the page, a detailed story is told of one cousin visiting another with lots of descriptions about places and events in Ohio. ”
Goodreads: Debbie rated it 4 of 5 stars

Click here to view on Amazon.com

Stingrays: Underwater Fliers

5th Aug 2015

“This nonfiction early reader gives facts about stingrays in an engaging, uncomplicated way. A mixture of photographs and illustrations complement the text well. This would be a helpful resource for student research projects, or a good leveled reader for middle-elementary nonfiction lovers.”
Kiss the Book.blogspot.com.

Laurie rated it 5 of 5 stars
“Text is easy but not oversimplified, perfect for the target age and group of readers. Good information and pictures.Will recommend for library purchase.”

Trudi rated it 5 of 5 stars
“Loved it! Very informative and interesting. I’m fascinated by the ocean and its inhabitants. I did not know that sharks and whales eat stingrays. . . Highly recommending!”

Click here to view on Amazon.com

Tuck-In-Time

5th Aug 2015

“Bedtime rituals comfort and reassure a mom and her little one. Only the mother’s voice is heard, as she directs the action. She plays a recognition game first, asking her toddler to tweak ears, push nose, flap arms, clap hands and more. Movement and exercise are added along with some tickling and stroking. A pet dog mimics the actions with a toy rabbit partner, playing along with the humans. Of course, it concludes with hugs and kisses all around. . . A charming bedtime read-aloud.” – Kirkus Online, June 1, 2014

“A stuffed bunny cavorting on the endpapers as well as a puppy, bunny in its mouth, standing guard by a bed in the following scene, usher children into this delightful bedtime ritual. Mom is tucking her little one in for the night by engaging the youngster in activities identifying body parts. Of course, tucking-in wouldn’t be complete without a loving hug and kiss. example. Mom, at first invisible or in partial view, fills the last pages as she enfolds her child in a warm embrace.” – Marianne. School Library Journal

Click here to view on Amazon.com

Seeds, Bees, Butterflies, and More!

4th Aug 2015

Selected as a 2014 National Council for Teachers of English Notable TitleClick here for Article

“Ideal for classroom use, this collection of short performance pieces introduces seed distribution, plant germination, the roles of roots and sunlight, pollinators and some familiar creatures. . . With short lines, Judicious use of rhyme and interesting language, the poetry works well.”

Kirkus Reviews, January 2013

“In the spirit of Paul Fleischman’s Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices (HarperCollins, 1987), Gerber presents 18 poems with lines to be read aloud. . . In an easy, kid-friendly fashion, the author explores relationships in nature. . . This collection will educate youngsters while showing them a fun way to read poetry.”
School Library Journal, January 2013

“This brilliant poetry book was written for two readers. Text is in two colors so readers can differentiate between the reading parts. Teachers could use this book to teach students about poetry. This book would also be good to use to teach students about fluency and prosody when reading aloud. This book would also be great for units about plant, flowers, pollination, bees and nature.”
Goodreads: Kristen Badger rated it 5 of 5 stars

Click here to view on Amazon.com

Leaf Jumpers

5th Aug 2015

Selected as one of 20 Choose to Read Ohio titles for 2015 and 2016 (http://www.library.ohio.gov/ctro) Choose to Read Ohio (CTRO) spotlights Ohio authors and promotes reading across Ohio. Each CTRO booklist highlights selected books and provides free, downloadable, resource-packed readers’ toolkits for current and past CTRO books.

Recommended by the National Science Teachers Association Grade Level: K-4 “Vivid colors, rhythmic words, and enchanting leaves will entertain the child in every reader of Leaf Jumpers. In addition to its artistic value, this children’s book is a wonderful guide to deciduous tree leaf identification.”
Judy Kraus, Science Teacher, Hyde Park Middle School

“The crisp excitement that fall brings sparkles on each page of this book. Image-packed poetry and watercolor and linoleum-block prints introduce the various trees as they are observed by a boy and a girl and their dog. . . A great introduction to the season.”
School Library Journal

2017 edition available as a board book

Click here to view on Amazon.com

Spring Blossoms

5th Aug 2015

“An ode to the beauty of the season, this book is a catalogue of flowering trees that will charm children. Written in rhyming couplets, Gerber’s spare text leaves plenty of room on the page for Evans’s luscious bursts of color, including all the fresh pinks and greens one would witness on a fine spring day. . . Given the new Common Core priorities, this book is a real plus.” – School Library Journal, August 2013

“The third in a seasonal series by Gerber and Evans, this picture book presents 10 different spring-blooming trees. Two young girls hold hands and skip out into a new spring day. “Spring is bursting out all over. / The sun is up. It’s warm. Let’s go! / Trees, so bare and plain in winter, / are dressed up for their yearly show.” Gerber’s gentle and informative text moves gracefully through the pages, providing descriptions of flowering trees. . .” – Kirkus Reviews, Feb. 2013

Click here to view on Amazon.com

Winter Trees

5th Aug 2015

Selected for the 2008 John Burroughs Young Readers List. “Winter Trees is an excellent addition to the distinguished books that have been added to the list in the past. The books selected for the list have to meet a demanding list of criteria that require that the book deals with nature with: Reality, Respect, Accuracy, Engagement, Enthusiasm, Beauty, and Magic. The Jury found that your book met all of those criteria.” – John Burroughs Association Young Readers List

Selected as a NSTA/CBC Outstanding Tradebook for 2009. “The uniqueness of the subject and the high quality of the text and illustrations have made this one of the NSTA/CBC Outstanding Tradebooks for 2009. This book would be a wonderful addition to any classroom or school library.” – Jose Rios, National Science Teacher Association

Click here to view on Amazon.com

Annie Jump Cannon, Astronomer

5th Aug 2015

“This inspiring picture-book biography of a trailblazer in the field presents insight into the challenges of women interested in science during the late 19th and early 20th centuries… The realistic illustrations capture the time period and complement the text. This title will be a welcome addition to collections looking for biographies of women scientists, or people who overcame adversity.”
Helen Foster James, University of California at San Diego. – School Library Journal

View the video on YouTube here.

Click here to view on Amazon.com

Little Red Bat

5th Aug 2015

“Generating sympathy for a bat isn’t always easy. Gerber pulls it off, though, thanks to some rewarding research and an engagingly repetitive structure. A little red bat hangs among the autumn leaves and wonders if she should stay in her tree or fly south. One by one, she meets a cast of woodland creatures, each of whom has its own plan. . . . It’s a lot to think about— enjoyably visualized in a spread in which all predators appear at once—but the little bat’s careful final decision is a wise one.” – Daniel Kraus, Booklist

View the video on SchoolTube here.

Click here to view on Amazon.com

Tales Of Old Columbus

18th Aug 2015

Published by the Columbus Historical Society, Through Children’s Eyes is the first new Columbus history book for children published in 40 years. Within its 58 pages are seven historical fiction stories researched and written by the author. Each is told from the perspective of the main character, an 8-year-old child. Topics include a child’s experience with the Underground Railroad, Abraham Lincoln’s visit to Columbus, the birth of the first African American child in Franklin County, and others.

Click here to view on Amazon.com